Salt Balance, High Blood Pressure and Ageing

Humans have about 100 grams of sodium in their body, most of them flowing in the blood mix. The body always strives for a range of sodium blood equilibrium, the excess sodium we don’t need being evacuated through urination, sweating or bowel movement.  On the other hand, when the body is short in sodium it absorbs more through the kidneys.

Eating salty food for a long time, however, can overwhelm the ability of the body to maintain such a balance. Furthermore, with ageing, when physical activity levels decline and the kidney filters become blunter than an old kitchen knife, the body retains more sodium.

Lots of sodium in the blood soaks up body water, creating a sodium-waterlogged blood, distension of blood vessels and high blood pressure.

Food industries – and what I found in my fridge

Profit is what motivates the food industries.  The corner store that flips the hot dogs, the coffee outlets that ask if you want breakfast, and the chefs behind your favorite restaurants: none of them care about your wellness and wellbeing. Salt sells their merchandise and salt is what you get.

Even dieters and weight watchers get fooled by how much salt they consume. I woke one morning with a mission: to hunt for sodium in the fridge. A glass bottle of sauce on the side rail contained 520 mg of sodium per tablespoon. To the right of the glass bottle, a plastic container of ranch yogurt salad dressing has 280 mg of sodium in two tablespoons, and the tomato paste next to the ranch yogurt has 160 mg of sodium in one tablespoon. As you can see, sodium intake adds up very quickly.

Now what?

Sodium exists in many natural foods. Get your sodium from natural sources such as apples, berries, vegetables, eggs, milk, herbs, seafood and many more.

Like sodium, iodine occurs in natural food.  Sources of iodine include kelp, seaweed, milk, eggs, fish, yogurt, shrimps, beans, and fruit or vegetables which grew in iodine-rich soil.

How much salt do we need?

Sodium is not all bad.  It helps keep blood flowing through the arteries and veins.  Another way sodium helps is to facilitate the entry of molecules such as glucose across the cell wall into the cytoplasm.

Half a teaspoon of iodized salt, containing 1163 milligram of sodium and 200 micrograms of iodine, is sufficient to provide most people with their daily sodium and iodine needs. Individuals with high blood pressure, or impaired liver, kidneys or heart, may need to limit their sodium intake even further.

Coupling iodine with salt is a convenient way to help people get their iodine requirement. The thyroid gland, located on the sides of the neck, needs iodine to produce thyroxin, an important body hormone. Mental impairment, weight gain, and goiter are some of the signs of a poorly functioning thyroid gland, which can be due to iodine deficiency.

11 tips to stop the sodium onslaught

  • Check the table salt in your kitchen today. Does it say iodized salt?
  • Notice the sodium content of the foods and snacks you eat and the seasonings you add to your meals.
  • Cook your own food, and request no salt in the food you eat out.
  • Half a teaspoon of iodized salt is enough to provide us with our daily sodium and iodine requirements.
  • Natural foods are better alternative sources of sodium and salt
  • Ask for salt-free or low salt at shops.
  • Know the sodium content of anything you toss into your pot or plate.
  • Read all food labels, especially packaged and processed food.
  • Take your blood pressure at least once every year, and more frequently if you suffer from high blood pressure.
  • Don’t rely on taste; do an online check for the sodium content of your favorite food, snacks, and seasonings.
  • Diarrhea, profuse sweating, and use of certain diuretics may necessitate a higher salt intake.

Disclaimer: Nothing in this article is meant to diagnose or treat any medical condition. Information provided is based solely on the author’s experience and understanding. Readers must seek advice from their own clinicians and nutritionists.

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